Follow buckshotjr's Liquid Cooling Adventure!

Discussion in 'Technology' started by OG buckshot jr, May 4, 2014.

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This thread is more than 365 days old. Therefore, it is better than any of the shit that gets posted nowadays.
  1. Stan Radner

    Stan Radner DARKLY Regular

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    Your sig made me laugh
    #41
  2. $alvador

    $alvador TD Member

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    well.. good. we can all use a good laugh
    #42
  3. OG buckshot jr

    OG buckshot jr TD Admin

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    Necro.....

    Starting out:
    [​IMG]
    Graphics card (had two, at one point but sold it cause SLI = useless):
    [​IMG]
    GPU disassembled:
    [​IMG]
    Better View:
    [​IMG]
    Close up of GPU PCB:
    [​IMG]
    GPU Chip cleaned up with alcohol:
    [​IMG]
    New thermal pads placed over VRAM (surrounding GPU) and MOSFET power supplies (6 of them towards bottom, 3 and 3):
    [​IMG]
    New paste on GPU:
    [​IMG]
    Block aligned with a few screws first, then rest go in:
    [​IMG]
    Back of GPU for reference:
    [​IMG]
    Checking gap, if any. Making sure thermal pads have contact:
    [​IMG]
    #43
  4. OG buckshot jr

    OG buckshot jr TD Admin

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    Temporary labels for Sata cables. This helped a lot. That's a large, old mouse pad I worked on, no static and soft so no damage to shit:
    [​IMG]
    The baggy that contained the screws for GPU water block - put all of the original screws right back in:
    [​IMG]
    SATA cables labelled:
    [​IMG]
    Starting to route shit, at a high-level:
    [​IMG]
    CPU back-plate to start:
    [​IMG]
    Side-view:
    [​IMG]
    Clean CPU placed in:
    [​IMG]
    Thermal paste applied:
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    CPU water block being mounted on the peg screws:
    [​IMG]
    Tightening opposite corners little by little, like lugnuts on a vehicle:
    [​IMG]
    Mounted showing inlet and outlet ports. Apparently you can use either or, but I used center for inlet; off-set center for outlet:
    [​IMG]
    Different view to more clearly show inlet (left) and outlet (right) that I chose. That silver/metal elliptical shape around the center [inside] is a water spreader - there are four types, depending on what CPU you get. They're incredibly effective:
    [​IMG]
    Full View of Mobo - getting there!:
    [​IMG]
    #44
  5. OG buckshot jr

    OG buckshot jr TD Admin

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    Case Disassembly:

    Bye-bye :):
    [​IMG]
    Full-view as shit comes apart:
    [​IMG]
    I put case screws back in, less to lose. You'll be surprised at the mess and sheer number of parts/screws/other lying around as you disassemble and build - every little bit helps:
    [​IMG]
    Stock front case grill - those trays are coming out:
    [​IMG]
    Inside front view of more shit coming out:
    [​IMG]
    Front grill re-worked:
    [​IMG]
    Top view - emptied out, readying for radiator:
    [​IMG]
    Front view:
    [​IMG]
    View or working area - this is what I meant by how much space you'll need and how much shit ends up everywhere. I cleaned as I went from section to section; like GPU, CPU/mobo, case disassembly etc:
    [​IMG]
    Mounting radiator - watching as I screw in screws to make sure they don't penetrate radiator fins:
    [​IMG]
    Side view of mounted radiator:
    [​IMG]
    Front view of mounted radiator. The yellow plugs are temporary and illustrate where I've chosen to have the inlet/outlet plugs located (at the front):
    [​IMG]
    Wider side view looking towards front (right):
    [​IMG]
    Dual-bay reservoir with Laing D5 Vario Pump attached. Figuring out which outlet to use:
    [​IMG]
    Turns out you have one option, so it's mounted with a 90degree to shoot up to radiator. All fittings are Bitspower, black chrome compression fittings. Nothing but the very best:
    [​IMG]
    Inlet - again, a 90degree because my loop would go: pump->Reservoir->CPU->GPU1->GPU2->Reservoir. GPU2 was not in this build; I added it later, then removed it again. I'll find pics of it later:
    [​IMG]
    Front view of reservoir mounted, as well as LCD temperature screens:
    [​IMG]
    Inside view after mounting pump, LCD screens etc. All wiring is temporary until all is mounted. I like to route cables last once everything is in place. I'll post updated pics after:
    [​IMG]
    This was my way of measuring tubing. Primitive as fuck, but surprisingly on my first ever liquid cooling build, I did not have to re-cut any piece of tubing :D:
    [​IMG]
    After connecting all tubing, I mounted the Power Supply. While leaving the power supply disconnected from everything, I jumped the power supply so I could turn it on when I needed as I filled liquid:
    [​IMG]
    #45
  6. OG buckshot jr

    OG buckshot jr TD Admin

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    I bought smaller tubing (can't remember inner/outer diameter, but I'll check later) and a turkey baster and connected them. Pro Tips, son, write this shit down..:
    [​IMG]
    The turkey baster acted like a small funnel, as well as an easy way for me to suck up bubbles as I filled the reservoir:
    [​IMG]
    The general guide is this:

    1. Fill Reservoir
    2. Turn on PSU to activate pump
    3. Immediately shut off PSU once reservoir gets low
    4. Refill reservoir
    5. Repeat 1-4 until constant flow
    Never run pump dry, you will break the pump. This is no joke.
    That said, I used a measuring cup as I filled it so I could tell how much my custom loop would use. This would help me when emptying the loop and cleaning it, to know what to expect:
    [​IMG]
    Front view of reservoir (it's got a clear tube in the middle that allowed me to slide an LED light strip in it - I couldn't resist..). The bubbles there are from a solution I used to combat corrosion. I use nothing but distilled water and a basic anti-corrosion additive. This is where the turkey baster allowed me to suck the bubbles right from the top:
    [​IMG]
    Bubbles = inefficiency, so what I did was turn my pump up fairly high to force shit out while moving my parts around. The CPU, since its attached to the case, I would pick up my hole case and hold it at different angles to help get CPU bubbles out. Here's a pick of me rotating and shaking GPU:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Last method is time.. left it run for a while, you're wasting next to no electricity and because your pc is actually not on (remember, the PSU is only connected to - and thus only powering - the pump), it's great to let it run a few hours. This is also good to find leaks, which I've never had because of compression fittings. They're worth their weight in gold, and easily are worth their $120 price tag for this build:
    [​IMG]
    Eventually, I re-routed cables (boring and I took no pics of it, but I promise I'll show updated pics of my case tomorrow) and got it all together to take some pics at night. The tubingis blue, but reactive to UV light. I laid two 30cm/1ft LED strips in my case, so tubing looks white-ish:
    [​IMG]
    Side angle of it closed up:
    [​IMG]
    Close up of side:
    [​IMG]

    I'll come back to update this thread with:
    1. How it looked with SLI and how I chose to tube it
    2. Update tubing as it is today
    3. Updated pics of cable routing etc. as it is today
    4. Start a new thread on how to clean a loop out - very, very important!!
    5. Start a new thread on the cable sleeving I'm now doing, as well case mods, paint, PSU painting etc.!

    I'm never done modding :) Cheers
    #46
    TankClash likes this.
  7. TankClash

    TankClash TF2 Staff | Chief Peon

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    Noice....... ya'know those magnetic bowls and mini white boards are handy for.... screws and shit or scrap IED HDD magnets work too for making your own.
    #47
    OG buckshot jr likes this.
  8. OG buckshot jr

    OG buckshot jr TD Admin

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    For sure! I have two of them in my garage. However, I neglected to use them because I wanted to keep 'sets' of screws together; for example, GPU screws together, cpu screws, case screws, mobo screws, liquid blocks (GPU and CPU) etc. I work very neatly. It costs me time, but well worth it. My method is using the baggy for new sets of screws to bag the old set.
    #48
Thread Status:
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